This Just In: Audio

Five New(ish) Audio Books*:

*Section only at ABC The Hague – there’s twice-weekly internal shipping though, if you want to collect something in Amsterdam!  Please note that a red abridged sign will be visible on any editions that are.  And finally, I would have included Steve Jobs, except it never even made it from the box to the shelf before it was sold!

V is for Vengeance by Sue Grafton

A woman with a murky past who kills herself-or was it murder? A dying old man cared for by the son he pummeled mercilessly. A lovely woman whose life is about to splinter into a thousand fragments. A professional shoplifting ring racking up millions in stolen goods. A brutal and unscrupulous gangster. A wandering husband, rich and powerful. A spoiled kid awash in gambling debt thinking he can beat the system. A lonely widower mourning the death of his lover, desperate for answers that may be worse than the pain of his loss. An elegant but ruthless businessman whose dealings are definitely outside the law: the spider at the center of the web.

And Kinsey Millhone, whose thirty-eighth-birthday gift is a punch in the face that leaves her with two black eyes and a busted nose.

V: Victim. Violence. Vengeance.

Read by Judy Kaye.

11/22/63 by Stephen King

On November 22, 1963, three shots rang out in Dallas, President Kennedy died, and the world changed. What if you could change it back? Stephen King’s heart-stoppingly dramatic new novel is about a man who travels back in time to prevent the JFK assassination.

Following his massively successful novel Under the Dome, King sweeps listeners back in time to another moment–a real life moment–when everything went wrong: the JFK assassination. And he introduces listeners to a character who has the power to change the course of history.

Jake Epping is a thirty-five-year-old high school English teacher in Lisbon Falls, Maine, who makes extra money teaching adults in the GED program. He receives an essay from one of the students–a gruesome, harrowing first person story about the night fifty years ago when his father came home and killed his mother, his sister, and his brother with a hammer. Harry escaped with a smashed leg, as evidenced by his crooked walk.

Not much later, Jake’s friend Al, who runs the local diner, divulges a secret: his storeroom is a portal to 1958. He enlists Jake on an insane–and insanely impossible–mission to try to prevent the Kennedy assassination. So begins Jake’s new life as George Amberson and his new world of Elvis and JFK, of big American cars and sock hops, of a troubled loner named Lee Harvey Oswald and a beautiful high school librarian named Sadie Dunhill, who becomes the love of Jack’s life–a life that transgresses all the normal rules of time.

Read by Craig Wasson.

Shatner Rules by William Shatner

William Shatner has had a million lives, it seems, since he played James Tiberius Kirk on Star Trek. In fact, he’s become an icon adored as much for being William Shatner as for his many starring roles. This audiobook gives his many fans a glimpse inside the genius of this unpredictable star. With insight, wisdom, and, of course, a heavy dose of humor, Mr. Shatner reveals the truth behind his persona and his own career longevity.

Read by the man himself – you have to admit, that’s hard to resist!  🙂

Drama: An Actor’s Education by John Lithgow

In this riveting and surprising personal history, John Lithgow shares a backstage view of his own struggle, crisis, and discovery, revealing the early life and career that took place out of the public eye.

Above all Lithgow’s memoir is a tribute to his most important influence: his father, Arthur Lithgow, who, as an actor, director, producer, and great lover of Shakespeare, brought theater to John’s boyhood. From bedtime stories to Arthur’s illustrious productions, performance and storytelling were constant and cherished parts of family life. “Drama” details with poignancy and sharp recollection the moments that introduced a budding young actor to the undeniable power of theater.

Before Lithgow gained fame with films like “The World According to Garp” and television shows like “3rd Rock from the Sun,” his early years were full of scenes both hilarious and bittersweet. His ruminations on the nature of theater, film acting, and storytelling cut to the heart of why actors are driven to perform, and why people are driven to watch them do it.

Lithgow chronicles the harrowing moments of his past, reflecting with moving candor on friends made and lost, mistakes large and small, and the powerful love of a father who set him on the road to a life onstage. Illuminating, funny, affecting, and thoroughly engrossing, “Drama” raises the curtain on the making of one of our most beloved actors.

Read by Mr. Lithgow himself, hooray!

Blue Nights by Joan Didion

From one of our most powerful writers, a work of stunning frankness about losing a daughter. Richly textured with bits of her own childhood and married life with her husband, John Gregory Dunne, and daughter, Quintana Roo, this new book by Joan Didion examines her thoughts, fears, and doubts regarding having children, illness, and growing old.

“Blue Nights” opens on July 26, 2010, as Didion thinks back to Quintana’s wedding in New York seven years before. “Today would be her wedding anniversary.” This fact triggers vivid snapshots of Quintana’s childhood–in Malibu, in Brentwood, at school in Holmby Hills. Reflecting on her daughter but also on her role as a parent, Didion asks the candid questions any parent might about how she feels she failed either because cues were not taken or perhaps displaced. “How could I have missed what was clearly there to be seen?” Finally, perhaps we all remain unknown to each other. Seamlessly woven in are incidents Didion sees as underscoring her own age, something she finds hard to acknowledge, much less accept.

“Blue Nights”–the long, light evening hours that signal the summer solstice, “the opposite of the dying of the brightness, but also its warning”–like The Year of Magical Thinking before it, is an iconic book of incisive and electric honesty, haunting and profoundly moving.

Read by Kimberly Farr.